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A blog discussing all things survival and zombie related. Because if you can learn to survive from zombies and you will thrive after anything. So keep your bug out bags close, because it's coming.

coldsteelknives:

Cold Steel G.I. Tanto

Photo credit (Instagram User): thetacticaldefender

www.coldsteel.com

zombiefacts:

Cool zombie weapon.


Home canning is an excellent way to preserve garden produce and share it with family and friends, but it can be risky or even deadly if not done correctly and safely.


It’s summer, and home gardeners are starting to harvest the delicious produce they’ve been growing this year. Did you know 1 in 5 U.S. households can their own food, and 65% of those households can vegetables? Home canning is a great way to preserve your garden goodies. But beware: if it’s done the wrong way, the vegetables you worked so hard for could become contaminated by a germ that causes botulism, a serious illness that can affect your nerves, paralyze you, and even cause death. Read on to learn about the symptoms and the safe way to can so you can protect yourself, your family, and others when you share your home-canned goodies.
(via CDC Features - Home Canning and Botulism)

It’s summer, and home gardeners are starting to harvest the delicious produce they’ve been growing this year. Did you know 1 in 5 U.S. households can their own food, and 65% of those households can vegetables? Home canning is a great way to preserve your garden goodies. But beware: if it’s done the wrong way, the vegetables you worked so hard for could become contaminated by a germ that causes botulism, a serious illness that can affect your nerves, paralyze you, and even cause death. Read on to learn about the symptoms and the safe way to can so you can protect yourself, your family, and others when you share your home-canned goodies.

(via CDC Features - Home Canning and Botulism)

Who’s up for a discussion?

aaron-5699:

survivethrive:

Got a question about zombies, or perhaps a theory or strategic plan for survival you want to share? We are all ears here at SurviveThrive and would love to engage in some zombie chatter and share our brains with you. So long as our flesh remains on our bones and brains in our heads.

So our question to you is, what are your plans to make it through the pending apocalypse?

How do you think it would start and the early warning signs to watch out for

If there is anything I love the most about zombies it’s origin theories.

Personally I like to pay close attention to the medical community when it comes to new illnesses and advancements in treatment mostly because I don’t trust medical providers. Don’t get me wrong here medical research is an important thing and the advances gained over the years have been great in practically eliminating very dangerous illnesses so in no way am I saying not to get vaccinated or seek medical help in the case of injury or illness. But sometimes people are shady and the thing is we as humans are constantly looking for the next cure as well as the next potential disease. Research and testing is a constant, but so are side effects to everything out there trying to make us healthier. Just look at the number of drugs that end up on the market only to end up pulled or under lawsuit for dangerous side effects. It all leads me to wonder what is being looked at right now and how many ways can it go wrong?Not only that but who out there isn’t looking for cures but rather just bigger and badder strains, ways to infect mass amounts of people, or seeking to build Biological weapons?

Scientists are very common in post apocalypse scenarios. The movie 12 Monkeys? An infectious disease researcher lets out a deadly strain in various cities around the world forcing survivors to live underground. 21 Days Later; researchers looking to create better soldiers invent viral strain that causes highly aggressive apes who attack animal rights activists and spread the toxic testing to people. The Crazies; military aircraft carrying a biological weapon crashes and contaminates waterways infecting towns and causing people to mentally deteriorate into deranged killers. Quarantine; doomsday cult member steals mutated rabies virus from chemical lab and infects apartment complex. I Am Legend; cure for cancer backfires when it mutates and infects people causing them to become aggressive towards uninfected. The list goes on. 

The short of it is science can do both great and horrible things, and its not just science fiction and horror movies proving that but history as well. If a zombie apocalypse were to happen I would suspect science to be behind it somewhere. Not to rule out something in nature cropping up to try an kill us all but with the constant push for living longer healthier lives could result in the end of the world.

As for what to watch for? That is a hard one but I would say follow news on new strains of diseases, watch for media coverage brushing off any potential spread of new or worsening strains, be cautious of vaccination or ‘cures’ that spring up quickly with new illnesses, and just keep yourself informed as far as you can beyond what a few people with a teleprompter on TV are saying. Never take anything at face value because there is plenty of information out there that can be readily accessed to educate anyone on a number of topics. You don’t have to be an expert on the subject just make sure you aren’t listening to only one expert when gathering information.

Who’s up for a discussion?

survivethrive:

Got a question about zombies, or perhaps a theory or strategic plan for survival you want to share? We are all ears here at SurviveThrive and would love to engage in some zombie chatter and share our brains with you. So long as our flesh remains on our bones and brains in our heads.

So our question to you is, what are your plans to make it through the pending apocalypse?

Here are some responses to this question, and my thoughts about them.

chris2cough08:

Living in Canada, its pretty obvious that we are safe. All the movies and tv shows, books and documentary’s all leave out Canada. Every disaster movie I’ve ever seen all forget about Canada, so quite literally, I’m safe up here.

On the other hand Canada might get wiped out first and thus why it gets left out of zombie and disaster media. Not much to chat about in a land of just dead is there? 

busyninjaac:

I am still trying to think of the best way of surviving. I will be responsible for me, my wife and our 13 kids. Very large number of people. Storing food or even growing food for that amount of people will be difficult.

Wow 13 kids?! That is a work force and a small community in one. Really you just need enough land to cultivate and a defense strategy for said land because you already have the farm hands and bodies to defend it. And that is not even to mention a governing structure set up already in your daily family dynamics. If I was you I would be learning about self sustaining communities and how to incorporate those methods into your life.

mrwyrd:

Beforehand, if there is one, stock up on can goods and junk food. I believe there will be a lot of bartering power when I have a box of twinkies in my hand.

Can goods are always a good thing to have on hand in case of emergency but junk food? Never thought about that. Most junk foods do have a good shelf life but I’m not so sure how much bartering power there would be for them. The nostalgia will be there for sure but I don’t see many people willing to trading goods or services for a quick sugar fix with no other value to it, but there is nothing to say that is not a possibility.

masterofnil:

Hat trick.

My grubby little mitts have been waiting for these. I am just starting to play with them and I may build a kit around them… or just offer them as an upgrade. I have a few mods planned, already have chopped the zipper pull on this one to lower the profile. Thanks to my buddy for the idea, hope I do it justice.

Anyway very low key and a great way to add another layer of E&E equipment on person. Conceal yourself and your kit.

I should have updates on this in the coming weeks.

eartheasy:

5 Tips to Guarantee Canning Success |  Blog 

Who’s up for a discussion?

survivethrive:

Got a question about zombies, or perhaps a theory or strategic plan for survival you want to share? We are all ears here at SurviveThrive and would love to engage in some zombie chatter and share our brains with you. So long as our flesh remains on our bones and brains in our heads.

So our question to you is, what are your plans to make it through the pending apocalypse?

Believe it or not, there are many excellent drought plants out there, that are highly attractive to pollinators. Initially, many people who find themselves with a dry or drought garden, may believe their options will be limited and their gardens will be dull.

However, drought landscapes and gardens do not have to be boring – they can be truly inspiring and striking – like the picture above! By combining different textures, forms and colours, the effect created can be visually stunning. Herbs, wildflowers and succulents especially, provide great options for gardeners wanting to attract bees to dry areas.

Learn more via Drought Plants for Bees and Pollinators

4 Tier Survival

dedurp:

4 Tier Survival

4-Tier Survival. The tiers are as follows:

  • TIER ONE: This is your everyday carry (EDC) on person. You should have this with you 24/7 or as close to 24/7 seven as possible. Basically, if you have pants on, you should have these items with you.
  • TIER TWO: This is your EDC bag. You should have this with you or within reach 24/7. Take it with you to work, the grocery store, running to the gas station, etc. If you walk out the door of your house, it should be with you.
  • TIER THREE: This is your 72 hour kit, bug out bag, SHTF bag, or any of those other catchy names for them. At a minimum you need one. If you only have the funds for one, so be it. But, eventually I would suggest having one for the house, the vehicle and possibly at work if you have the space to store one.
  • TIER FOUR: This is for long term preparedness. This is long-term food and water storage and procurement methods. Always prepare your home to shelter-in-place first. Then, if you have a secondary bug out location, prepare it. Depending on the disaster or emergency you may or may not be able to bug out. On the other hand, you may be forced to evacuate or bug out.

Before I go any farther in this article I want to give you a great piece of advice:Develop and hone your knowledge, ability and skills over the knives, tools and kits. A vast amount of knowledge and skills with a minimum amount of tools will keep you and your family alive a lot longer than a vast amount of tools and minimum amount knowledge and skills will.This may seem contradictory to what this article is about. But, do not lose sight of this advice. Everyone knows someone who has the newest, best whatever it is but no clue how to use it. This makes them look like a fool. Don’t be a fool.
When creating the tiers, I kept in mind the basic needs of a survival situation, shelter, water, fire, food and I am going to add protection. In a the end of the world as we know it (TEOTWAWKI) situation, protecting yourself, your family, home, supplies and gear could be a paramount priority. The first three tiers will enable you to get to your fourth tier. We all find ourselves away from 
Now, let’s discuss the tools and supplies I feel are needed for each tier. This is by no means the end all, be all list of what is needed. This is what I have come up with for my kits. Feel free to add or take away as you feel necessary. This is based off of my skill set and my family needs. I wanted to condense a lot of information into a single article and basically get you thinking about what you will need. I want you to come up with your own kits. I also wanted to show you that all of the tiers are possible. They will take some time, energy and money, but anyone can do this.
Note: I will not get very technical in the types/brands of items to carry. Use your own judgment; remember, most times you get what you pay for. Also, I go by the mantra, “Two is one, one is none.”
TIER ONE: On-person EDC

  • Blades/Tools
    • Quality folding knife of your choice. Make sure it is sharp. You are more likely to injure yourself trying to cut something with a dull knife than you are using a sharp knife.
    • Quality multi-tool. There are many options available. Look at the type of environment you spend the majority of time in, consider your skills, and use this to decide the brand/style of tool you want to carry.
    • Lock picks/Bogota – I choose NOT to carry these as of now. Remember what I said about skills earlier. I know I don’t have the skills needed to use these. Now, once I develop the skills, they will be added to my EDC.
    • Small compass. Just to get a general direction if needed.
    • Pen and small notepad. I personally like the waterproof kind. Nothing like getting caught in the rain and losing everything you have made notes of.
    • Small survival whistle.
    • Cotton bandana.
    • P-38 can opener. I carry one on my key ring. I forget it is even there, until I need it.
  • Cell Phone
    • Pretty self-explanatory. Pretty much everyone has a cell phone that they carry anyway. [JWR Adds: It is important to also keep a 12 VDC cell phone “car charger” handy.]
  • Cordage
    • 550 Cord. There are lots of different, creative ways to carry. There are bracelets, key fobs, zipper pulls, belts, even lacing your boots/shoes with it. Learn how to braid your own items.
  • Fire
    • Small brand name lighter. Cheap and easy to carry way to start a fire.
    • Small firesteel. Another cheap, easy to carry way to start a fire.
    • Tinder. Could be a magnesium rod, dryer lint, or any brand of quick tinder that is out on the market now, you should know what works. I prefer magnesium rods; they take up less room and are light.
  • Firearm
    • I am not going to start the never-ending conversation of discussing brands and calibers.
    • Find a gun that you can comfortably carry and shoot.
    • Shoot, a lot.
    • Shoot from behind cover, kneeling, sitting, lying down, standing, off hand, from one yard to 25 yards.
    • Shoot some more.
    • Practice reloading, practice reloading behind cover, practice reloading standing, kneeling, lying down, off hand.
    • Practice some more.
  • Light
    • Small flashlight. I personally look for an LED version that runs off of AA or AAA batteries. Look for one that is waterproof or at the very least water resistant.
    • Keychain LED light. Look for one that has a locking on/off switch. These are easier to use in the fact that they do not have to have constant pressure on the switch to illuminate.
  • USB Drive
    • I use my USB drive to store all types of important documents and other information I run across and want to save. I have encrypted my USB drive in case it falls into the wrong hands. (I strongly suggest doing this.) Also, save the information under nondescript names. In other words, don’t save the file as: “Insurance Papers” or “Social Security Cards”, etc.
    • Birth/Marriage Certificates
    • Social Security Cards
    • Driver’s License
    • Insurance Policies/Cards
    • Vehicle Registrations/Insurance
    • Medical/Shot Record
    • Recent Check Stubs/Bank Statements
    • Stocks/Bonds
    • Property Description
    • Another option/addition to this is online file storage. There are many places available on the internet to store files on a remote server and be able to access from any computer or cell phone with internet access.

Some people I have seen carry as much as possible on their keychain. The only thing with that is if you lose your keys, you have lost a lot of your gear. I carry some stuff on my belt, some in pockets and some on a keychain. I have even seen and thought about carrying some items around my neck. Whatever you feel comfortable with and what works for you is best.

TIER TWO: EDC Bag
Tier two is going to contain pretty much everything from tier one except bigger and better.

  • Blades/Tools
    • Quality fixed blade knife of your choice. Again make sure it is sharp.
    • Sharpening stone.
    • Quality multi-tool. I would look at one to complement the one from tier one. A little larger and possibly features that the other does not have. I personally wouldn’t want the exact same model from tier one. Look at the ones that have the screwdriver possibilities.
    • Small entry bar or pry bar.
    • Larger more reliable compass. Possibly a GPS system if you are so inclined. If you are in a large urban environment, I would have a city map in my EDC bag.
    • Pens and notepad again. Plenty of pens and permanent markers.
    • P-51 can opener.(A scaled-up version of the P-38.)
  • Cell Phone/Communications
    • This is where I would keep a wall charger for my cell phone.
    • I would also think about one of the emergency chargers that run off of batteries at this point.
    • I also carry a pay-as-you go phone in my EDC bag. On some occasions when one service is down, others are still up and running. It’s a cheap insurance policy.
    • Radio of some sort. Depends on your location and abilities.
  • Cordage
    • I would carry no less than 25 feet of 550 cord in my EDC bag. The more the better. Again, options here, braid it to take up less space, key fobs, I’ve seen some braided water bottle carriers. Use your imagination
    • I have run across Kevlar cord, no personal experience with it. But, something I will check out.
    • I would toss in some duct tape and electrical tape here. You can take it off of the cardboard roll and roll it onto itself and it takes up very little room.
    • Possibly some wire, picture hanging wire works well.
    • Possibly some zip ties. Various sizes as you see fit.
    • I also have a couple of carabiners clipped to my bag.
  • Fire
    • Another cheap lighter.
    • Larger firesteel.
    • More tinder. Personally I prefer the magnesium, but whatever you are comfortable with.
  • Firearm
    • I personally don’t see the need to carry a second firearm.
    • I would however warrant the carrying of at least two spare magazines for the handgun in tier one.
  • First-Aid
    • Basic first aid kit.
    • Package of quick slotting agent.
    • Basic EMT shears.
    • Basic pain relievers, fever reducers, upset stomach tablets etc.
    • Small bottle of hand sanitizer.
    • Baby wipes.
  • Food
    • I always carry a couple of energy or meal replacement bars in my bag. If nothing else, I may have to work through lunch and need a snack.
    • Some people will toss a freeze-dried meal or MRE if they have room. Personally, I don’t.
    • A small pack of hard candy.
  • Light
    • I personally prefer a headlamp at this stage. You can use a headlamp as a flashlight; you can’t use a flashlight as a headlamp.
    • If you don’t go the headlamp route, choose a higher quality flashlight than tier one.
    • Extra batteries. On the subject of batteries, do your best to acquire electronic items that use the same size of battery.
    • Another keychain light. I have one attached to the inside of my bag to aid in finding items inside in low-light situations.
    • Some people carry chemical light sticks in their EDC bag. I have found battery operated light sticks that also have a small flashlight in one end I prefer to carry.
  • Shelter
    • I keep a packable rain jacket at all times and depending on the weather a packable pair of rain pants. Remember, your clothing is your first form of shelter.
    • I also keep a couple of “survival” blankets in my bag.
    • I keep a couple of contractor style garbage bags as well.
  • Water
    • I have a stainless steel water bottle that stays in my pack at all times. If I am traveling longer than my normal commute, I will toss in a small collapsible water container.
    • Ziploc bags.
    • Two-part chemical water purifier.
    • Filtering drinking straw.
    • Toss in a couple of standard coffee filters to filter sediment if needed.

Now, bear in mind, my EDC bag is not for long-term survival. I feel like I could sustain myself for several days if I needed to with the contents of my pack. However, that is not its intended use. All of the tiers are designed to sustain you until you can “make it” to the next tier.

My EDC bag is the same bag I use for school every day. Granted I cannot carry a weapon or ammunition into the school building. My point is you don’t want all of your Tier Two items to be so big and bulky that you can’t comfortably carry them. All of this stuff is in addition to my school books and papers and tablet. For those of you that are curious, I prefer a messenger style bag. But, again, whatever works for you and is the most comfortable.

TIER THREE: Larger rucksack or backpack

A lot of people would call this the 72 hour kit. I feel that this is a bit of a misnomer. Granted, 72 hours is a good figure for most people to shoot for. However, I feel that in this stage of the game, you should be able to carry enough to survive indefinitely.

  • Blades/Tools
    • Quality fixed blade knife. If you want you can double up from tier two. Depends on your requirements. Remember, two is one, one is none.
    • Small quality folding shovel.
    • Quality hatchet.
    • Small machete. If you feel that your knife is up to the task of clearing brush, no need for one. Also, if you are in a true bug out situation where people could be looking for you, you don’t want to clear a highway through the brush.
    • Some type of saw or saw blades. There are some nice pocket chain saws on the market now. Or you could carry blades and fashion your own handle or frame.
    • Tools for forced entry if warranted. Pry bars, bolt cutters, etc.
    • Tool kit. Depends on your location and environment. At the bare minimum carry enough tools to repair anything that you are depending on in a survival situation.
  • Cell Phone/Communications
    • Depending on the level of the disaster cell phones may or may or may not be working.
    • Again, depending on your location and abilities, depends on the type of communications you should carry.
    • One thing I have not seen widely talked about is two way radios. Obviously this would be if more than one person is in your party. However, now you start talking about batteries and chargers.
  • Cordage
    • At least 100 feet of 550 cord.
    • Depending on your environment, climbing rope, harness and gear may be warranted.
    • Tape, electrical and duct.
    • Zip ties, various sizes
    • Wire, picture wire.
    • Carabiners, various sizes.
  • Fire
    • Cheap lighter.
    • Firesteel.
    • Tinder.
    • Camp stove. Small, lightweight, portable. A lot of good information about this out there. Pay special attention to the type of fuel that the stove you select uses.
  • Firearm

This depends on the type of situation you are in. I will list the types of firearms I would have, not necessarily carry, and reasons why. If this is a true bug out situation obviously the adults in your party could carry at least one, more than likely two, long guns.

  • We have already discussed a handgun.
  • “Modern Sporting Rifle”. Be it an AR based platform, an AK-47, Mini-14 etc. I personally like the AR platform. However, A’s can be a bit finicky if not properly cleaned and maintained. Something you may not be able to do well in a TEOTWAWKI situation. So, I would grab an AK-47. Whatever your budget and preference lead you to.
  • .22 caliber rifle. There are many options, I personally recommend the Ruger 10-22. There are several collapsible stocks available. This is for hunting small game.
  • Home defense shotgun. I would suggest a 12 gauge. The options and setups are endless. You can go as mild or as wild as your budget and imagination allow. This is not something I would necessarily always grab. However, this is something I feel that no home should be without. The sound of a shell racking into the chamber of a pump shotgun is a sound that will deter most people without even firing a shot.
  • Extra magazines and ammunition.
  • First-Aid
    • More advanced first aid kit. There are pre-made ones on the market or come up with your own.
    • Quick clotting agent.
    • EMT Shears.
    • Pain relievers, fever reducers, upset stomach pills, etc.
    • A week’s supply of any prescription medications.
    • Any supply of antibiotics or narcotics that you can procure.
    • Knowledge of natural/herbal remedies. Here is a great area where knowledge can help you a lot longer than supplies can.
  • Food
    • If you want to put in a three day supply of freeze-dried meals or MRE’s. Go for it. But here is where procuring your own food will come in handy.
    • I would suggest some type of mess style kit for cooking. Again, your choice.
    • Fishing kit. Fishing line, assortment of hooks, sinkers and artificial bait if desired.
    • Fishing “yo-yo” traps. Can be set and left alone to catch fish while you are doing some other task. I feel these are a necessity. They are light and take up little room.
    • Snare kit. I would suggest several pre-made snares and supplies to create more.
    • Traps. Connibear style traps, an assortment of sizes. 4-6 is all you should need.
    • Frog gigs. Could also be used for spearing fish, depending on your location.
    • You also have a firearm for taking small or large game.
    • Knowledge of wild edibles in your area or bug out location.
  • Light
    • Again, I would suggest a headlamp and extra batteries.
    • Use your discretion for what else you may want/need.
  • Shelter
    • Two changes of clothes. One for warm weather and one for cool/cold weather. Again depending on your environment.
    • I would suggest at least 3 pair of underwear and 6 pair of socks.
    • Packable rain gear.
    • Quality bivy style shelter or tarp.
    • Quality sleeping bag. Again, do some research. See what fits your needs and budget.
    • Sleeping pad if wanted.
    • Possibly a pocket style hammock.
  • Water
    • Stainless steel water bottle.
    • Chemical water treatment.
    • Water filter/purifier. Again, look at your budget and needs. There are several nice options out there.
    • Coffee filters for straining out sediment.
    • Collapsible water storage.

TIER FOUR: Long term preparedness.
Even though this is the largest of all the tiers, I will probably go into the least amount of detail. There are many great sources of information concerning long term preparedness, SurvivalBlog.com being one of the best, if not the best, in my opinion.

  • Blades/Tools
    • Obviously any blade or tool previously discussed. Except full size versions.
    • An ax, saws, shovels, garden hoes, rakes, etc.
    • Possibly a plow, seeder, etc, for planting a garden.
    • Variety of hand tools.
    • Automotive tools, carpentry tools, etc.
    • Sewing machine, needles, thread, clothing patterns, etc.
    • Begin thinking of ways you can use your tools and knowledge to develop a skill that can be used for trade or barter.
  • Communication
    • Short wave radios, ham radios, etc.
    • Two way radios.
  • Cordage
    • Large amounts of any cordage or supplies under cordage already discussed.
  • Fire
    • Cast iron stove.
    • Fireplace.
    • Begin thinking now about how you will be heating your home in the winter. Think about how you will be cooking your meals. Also, think about how you will get fuel for your fire.
  • Firearms
    • We discussed in tier three the types of firearms I felt were needed.
    • Begin thinking about amount of ammo you can and are willing to stockpile.
    • Begin thinking about reloading your own ammunition. Begin thinking about stockpiling supplies. This can be turned into great bartering items.
  • First Aid
    • Begin developing a large first aid supply. Think about what you will need to do without a doctor present. Suture kits, surgical kit, trauma kit, etc. There will be no running to the emergency room.
    • Begin thinking about dental supplies. Again, there will possibly be no dentists to go to.
    • Again, knowledge is key in this situation. There are some good books about this type of thing. Take a first aid class, learn CPR. Learn as much as you possibly can.
    • Study about and begin stockpiling medications.
  • Food
    • There are many more articles to be written and read on this subject alone.
    • Start developing a small reserve of foods that you eat on a regular basis that have a long shelf life. Start with a week; go to a month, then three months, then a year, then longer.
    • Begin thinking now about storage. A year’s supply of food for your family will take up a considerable amount of space.
    • Expand on the amount of items you have from tier three. Increase the number of traps and snares you have.
    • Think about obtaining a variety of seeds to plant in your garden.
    • Again, there is a vast amount of information to be found on this subject alone. The main thing I want you to understand is this is doable, on any income. Start small and work your way up to larger quantities.
    • Do not get yourself into a financial burden by going out and buying a year’s supply of food at one time.
  • Light
    • Begin obtaining lanterns, fuel, mantles, etc.
    • Begin thinking about candles and candle making.
    • If you are so inclined, begin thinking about solar panels for your home or shelter location.
  • Shelter
    • Begin making those small repairs to your home. Things that may be fairly quickly and easily fixed now may not be so easily fixed later. I’m not talking kitchen remodeling; I’m talking leaky faucets, broken windows, drafty doors, etc.
    • Think about having a metal roof installed if you don’t have one already.
    • This is the time to think about a secondary survival location. A remote, rural location. Think of this as an investment. It could be used now as a vacation spot. Use it later as a retirement home.
  • Water
    • Begin storing water. Think not only about drinking, but also cooking and cleaning.
    • Again, start small. Begin with a few days worth; then weeks and months.
    • Start thinking about long-term procurement and storage. Gutters that empty into water storage, etc. Think also about purification on a large scale.
  • Miscellaneous Things to Thing About
    • Sit down and make a list of normal, everyday things that you do around your house, cleaning, washing, “personal” business, entertainment, etc.
    • These are activities that require items that you will not be able to run down to the store to get.
    • Toiletries. Soap, shampoo, toothpaste, toilet paper, razors, shaving cream, feminine hygiene, etc.
    • Cleaning. Bleach, disinfectant, dish soap, laundry detergent, etc.
    • Entertainment. Cards, board games, puzzles, books, etc.
    • Think about large quantity storage of fuel; for cooking, heating, anything with an internal combustion engine, etc.

Again, I have very briefly touched on long term preparedness. There are numerous articles and books on long term preparedness. Read them. This is meant merely as a primer to get you thinking about long term survival.

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